My diversity of field sites

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“All I’m armed with is research.” 

-Mike Wallace

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PhD Research

September 2021 - Present

For my PhD, I will be focusing on how multiple stressors interact (e.g., marine heatwaves, deoxygenation and human actions) and affect various aspects of coral and rocky reef communities. This work is important because the interactions amongst different stressors are often unpredictable but very common and lead to losses in ecosystem functioning and less productive environments. While the effect of two stressors can equal the sum of the effect that each stressor would have on an environment individually (additive), the majority of the reported results of multiple stressors have been interactive with effects that are larger than the additive effect (synergistic) anticipated and observed. Thus, I want to examine how these stressors influence the invertebrate and algal communities on shallow reefs through impacts on foundational habitat forming species such as coral and kelp. My aim will be to examine these factors using a hierarchical framework (i.e., spatial, temporal and experimental).

MSc Research

September 2019 - August 2021

I was a Master's student in the Baum lab at the University of Victoria. While I was not actually able to go to my field site due to a global pandemic, I was able to use previously collected photoquadrats to analyze coral communities on Kiritimati, the world's largest atoll. I examined the impacts of local and global disturbances on coral biodiversity. Specifically, I examined the impacts of heat stress on soft corals, an overlooked and highly vulnerable component of coral reef ecosystems and tried to disentangle the impacts of multiple stressors on coral reef diversity through tipping points and interactive effects. This work led to two publications, both of which are currently in review or prep. If you are interested in my MSc research, you can watch some of my previous presentations for the Global Reef Week Conference or Western Society of Naturalists Conference

South African Shark Conservancy

July 2019 - August 2019

I had the opportunity to spend a month in Hermanus, South Africa as an intern with the South African Shark Conservancy. I had my first hands-on experience working in marine systems and with catsharks and shysharks. I analyzed BRUV (baited remote underwater videos), measured and tagged sharks, and learned many shark surveying techniques. I also had the opportunity to further develop my skills as a team leader and scientific research skills. I had an amazing experience working with SASC and if you are interested in getting some experience working with sharks and developing your professional skills, check out their programs

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Zoology Honours

Sept 2018 - April 2019

I began working with Dr. Jessica Theodor's lab after my summer field season with Dr. Barclay. I took wing photos with working with Dr. Barclay, in order to analyze the amount of sexual dimorphism that occurs in bats of various foraging styles using geometric morphometrics under the guidance of Dr. Theodor. I examined sexual dimorphism within bat species, as female bats increase body mass by 20-30% during pregnancy resulting in larger female than male bats. This increase in female body mass should cause females to have different wing shapes to compensate for an increased body mass during the year and I am examining if there are differences in the amount of sexual dimorphism based on the foraging style of each species as wing shape will also affect the maneuverability of the bats. This work was published as Maucieri et al 2021

Lamanai, Belize

May 2018

I was able to participate in the Biodiversity and Conservation in Belize course through the University of Calgary during my undergraduate career. I was able to conduct research in tropical environments and learn about the different issues that tropical environments are facing. Belize was beautiful and I enjoyed my time there learning about the environment and getting to know the locals. Hopefully, I will be able to go back one day.

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Jackson Lab

May 2017 - Aug 2017

I worked as a research assistant in Dr. Leland Jackson’s Lab. We studied the effects of wastewater on zooplankton biomass in aquatic ecosystems and worked at Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA) at the Pine Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in the experimental streams. I performed chlorophyll pigment and ash-free dry mass analyses on biofilm collections as well as collecting water and depth samples in small southern Albertan lakes. Water samples were analyzed back in the lab for total suspended solids, chlorophyll content, phosphorus content, and zooplankton density, and community composition. I also had the opportunity to lead day camp activities where I taught children about aquatic invertebrate diversity in Calgary.

Bamfield, BC

May 2017

During my undergraduate degree, I was able to participate in the Biodiversity of Seaweeds course at Bamfield Marine Sciences Center. I was able to explore and come to love the diverse landscape that is present on the west coast of Vancouver Island. It is here that I fell in love with kelp and marine ecology, and is what fuelled my pursuit of a marine ecology Master's program.

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Kananaskis, AB

Aug 2016

As part of the ecology program at the University of Calgary, there is a field course Ecol 413 which takes place out at the Barrier Lake Biogeoscience Institute. Through this course, I was introduced to many terrestrial and aquatic field research techniques and was given the time to improve my project design, scientific writing and presentation skills. This course was so much fun and allowed me to make many friendships that will last for many years to come with many wonderful ecologists.

Smithers, BC

May 2016 - July 2016

I worked as a research assistant with Dr. Kathy Martin’s Ph.D. student Devin de Zwaan. The work was located on the Hudson’s Bay Mountain, just outside Smithers, BC, where I spent over 600 hours working in the subalpine. We studied the effects of predation on the nestling development of the Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris) and I assisted with banding and measuring nestlings, setting up and running predation experiments and observing the bird population behavior. We also simulated increases in predation using fox and raven models accompanied by soundtracks and collected last season’s geo-locators along with distributing new geo-locators to provide insight into the migration patterns of these birds.